7-Eleven Singapore serves up seven ready-to-eat meals with Impossible Foods

Robert Stockdill

Robert Stockdill

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7-Eleven Singapore is taking plant-based meals even further mainstream, partnering with Impossible Foods to create a range of seven ready-to-eat meals available across its 350 stores.  

7-Eleven Singapore serves up seven ready-to-eat meals with Impossible Foods

The range of meals – all selling for between S$2.80 and S$6 (US$2 to $4.40) – comprises burgers, minced meat noodles, meatballs & mash, a wrap, a rendang Onigiri, and shepherd’s pie. All are halal-certified.

The launch of six new items this week follows what Impossible Foods’ Singapore country manager Laurent Stevenart describes as “the immense popularity” of the 7-Select Impossible Deluxe Burger launched earlier this year.  

7-Eleven Singapore serves up seven ready-to-eat meals with Impossible Foods

“The convenience of 7-Eleven’s store footprint is unmatched,” he said. “One of the most important steps to achieving our mission is to achieve price parity with beef from cows. Long-term, we plan to be more affordable.”

Steven Lye, MD at 7-Eleven Singapore, says that given the size of the chain’s network, the company is in a position to help Impossible Foods make plant-based eating “more accessible and convenient anytime, anywhere”.

“As the leading convenience store, 7-Eleven is uniquely positioned to make a meaningful difference in our communities.”

7-Eleven Singapore serves up seven ready-to-eat meals with Impossible Foods

Impossible Beef “looks, tastes and smells like ground beef from cows” – but is made entirely from plants, resulting in a much smaller environmental footprint than meat from animals. Made from plants, it uses 96-per-cent less land, 87-per-cent less water, and generates 89-per-cent less greenhouse gasses, according to Impossible Foods.

Every 113gm serving of Impossible Beef consumed saves 7sqm of land, 3kg of CO2, and 84 litres of water. 

The availability of plant-based meat alternatives in ready meals and fast food is growing rapidly in developed markets in Asia, the US and Australasia. In the US, for example, orders for plant-based pizza ingredients are surging as more and more consumers adopt a flexitarian or plant-based diet.

Robert Stockdill

Robert Stockdill

Robert Stockdill is a content writer with more than 30 years of experience in five countries. His style has built upon award-winning success in news and features in the print media to leadership in digital communication, spanning news websites, social media, magazines, brochures, and contributing to books. Recognising the devastating impact of consumer behaviour on the planet and wanting to help make a difference Robert launched Viable.Earth as a platform to celebrate positive contributions by brands, companies and individuals towards reducing environmental impact and improve sustainability – especially in the fields of fashion, beauty, food, lifestyle, and transportation.

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